Category Archives: pork

A Portland Character Sketch

I thought y’all might like to see a bit more of Portland, my new home. I haven’t posted anything on it specifically since Tax Day, so here’s a bit more on its character, and why I’m still thinking it’s a great place…

William Carlos WIlliams

So Much Depends… a red wheelbarrow on NE Alberta St

Art. Is. Everywhere.

dutch baby

Lemon-anointed Dutch Baby at Helser’s on NE Alberta

So is good food. It’s pretty much a playground for foodies.

Ken's artisan pizza

THE famous Ken’s artisan pizza

After many months of wondering, I finally tried a Ken’s pizza (Pizza Night at the Bakery is every Monday night, and it gets a bit crazy). Delicious.

sandwich from Biloxi

A pulled-pork po-boy mash-up from new restaurant Biloxi on N. Mississippi Ave.

This fine sandwich was even served alongside the chance to view the entire crew of Portlandia chowing down on N. Mississippi Ave. Those are julienned fried pickles, folks. Someone takes themselves seriously…

peach panna cotta serratto

Peach panna cotta at Serratto in NW

This panna cotta at a local Italian restaurant almost made me weep, it was so good. I’m not usually a plain-cooked-milk person, but the vanilla, the peak-of-perfection local summer stone fruit- made me eat more than I should have.

bacon sandwich Radio Room

PT’s Breakfast Sandwich at Radio Room on NE Alberta St.

This one I discovered while meeting a friend at the Radio Room, a restaurant that has defied the trend and NOT become a McMenamin’s. Its style and personality do it credit, as you can see from their site. Also, this breakfast sandwich was amazing, and I did manage to have leftovers from that colossus.

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The spread at Olympic Provisions has to be my favorite by far. They specialize in salumeria–curing, spicing, and drying their own meats–but if you had given us only their vegetable dishes or their chilled roasted shrimp masterpiece, we would have been just as happy. Everything was done to the highest standard and with the most vivid imagination for flavor combinations, and they worked! Amazing place in inner SE Portland.

hush puppies and pulled pork at bite of oregon

This was a find at the Bite of Oregon festival: hush puppies that rivalled those found in the heart of Virginia, if you can believe it. Crisp and dark on the outside, moist and flavorful corniness on the inside, with peppers and red onion. Scrumptious.

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Another local NW Portland place that I’d heard about long before I actually got to go: Smokehouse. Definitely takes it smoking seriously. We were there mid-way through the evening and they were out of their smoked chicken, so I’ll have to wait on that (I’ve only had it once before in my life, but it was just about perfect), but in the meantime, their pulled pork made for 4 meals, and their sides–baked beans and braised greens–kept up for two leftover meals.

Lovejoy chocolate tart with lemon and raspberry

Finally, just to show I’m not completely biased toward Ken’s, here is something I came across at Lovejoy Bakers, another sandwich/ bakery place in NW. Their sandwiches left me a little cold, but this, a chocolate tart shell with lemon curd and raspberry coulis inside? Bliss.

 

 

 

And of course, there is also the bizarre, hipster side of Portland, as advertised… (Collage has awesome-sounding craft workshops for $5, 10, 25, which I’ve been meaning to try out…)

vintage german doll legs

Doll legs to be had, along with a lot of Dia de los Muertos-themed items, at Collage

Couldn’t resist this juxtapostion…

catholic church and pbr beer truck

PBR, Beer of Hipsters Everywhere

 

…so those have been some of my adventures! Largely spurred on by visits of lovely friends from around the country, but also by great recommendations from new-found Portland friends. (Thank you.)

Yep, Portland and me, we’re like two peas in a pod.IMAG5058

Disagree? Got any sizzling tips to add to this list? Jump in to comment, Portlandians!

Bluff City and Home of the Blues

Memphis.

What side of this city did I see? Several, actually. I had two trips there for work, one in March and one in May. I met the nicest, funniest hotel staff at the welcome and valet desks both times. I observed the pieces of the city’s history that residents refuse to let go, such as the trolley, the horse carriages, and bygone symbols of its fame and glamour, like the named music notes in the sidewalk.

I also experienced Beale Street, sort of. Not in the rip-roaring, guitar-wielding, flam-doozling way someone else might have (it was with work, after all), but bar-hopping and cooling my heels in the shade listening to the street hawkers and the wildly cacophonous competing music venues in the small space was certainly a unique experience. Plus, good company.

And oh yeah, I found plenty of good eats. I did my exploring online beforehand, as well as through friend networks. They all pointed to one place: Rendezvous.

The place was happily down-home, with random knickknacks, lots of tourists, and a we-don’t-take-no-guff attitude at the front desk. Only open for dinner (not lunch) during the week- that was odd. Their specialty was most certainly the “Dry-Rub Ribs,” but my coworker’s brisket was mighty tasty too.

The ribs were pretty addictive, and quite unique- it’s kind of like tasting a really salty food- all the crystals tingle in your mouth- but then you realize they contribute to a seasoned, earthy  flavor, not just salt. Who needs sauce, anyway?
It turns out the seasoning mix contains oregano (a main Greek spice) because the immigrant family that started the joint was from Greece! I love when food connects back to the travel theme…of course it always helps your food when it’s got history and whole-heartedness.
Another place I had to stop at was The Little Tea Shop- I mean, come on. Tea. Home cooking. This was a place I found by reputation online. Their most touted items were the vegetarian turnip/ collard greens and the corn sticks: “crispy on the outside yet flaky and buttery on the inside.”
The Little Tea Shop, in its position as a local institution/ legend, deigns to be open for lunch only. And its waitresses tend to be a little short (with their words, not their height), which I chalked up to cultural differences. Oh, and neither their cash register nor their credit card machine was working, so the woman at the front had her hands full trying to make change for people out of spare change she had in a PAPER BAG. It was wildly endearing, and made for a great story.

So, besides the barbeque (sort of) and Beale Street, what other sides are there to Memphis? Well, there are the fun new ‘cuisine-y’ type places popping up (Local Gastropub comes to mind as a place where we had great food, but slow service), and you’ve got your music history pathways to follow.
But my antennae went up as the cab driver from the airport said he knew how to direct us to “any number of diversions, from used bookstores to-“
“Hold up, did you say used bookstores?”
*Done.*

I found one or two downtown, and went on a bit of an adventure to Midtown, a short drive away from the downtown, and home to Memphis’ hipsters and dive monkeys, to find another one, pictured below. Heaven! (Loved the quirky aisle caps consisting of chairs with vintage typewriters)

And how could I forget the fried chicken! Gus’s Fried Chicken was very low-key, and although “Gus’s World Famous Hot & Spicy Chicken” is its full title, I didn’t find it spicy. And I’m a wimp, soooo… Gus’s didn’t have the kind of sustainable sourcing policy of the places I usually find on these trips, but the chicken was so tender and juicy, I went back twice!


Ohmigod, and just like in Omaha, TRY THE FRIED PICKLES. Gus’s were entire spears, and had a spicy crunchy coating- dee-lish.

Besides these neighborhood attractions, a group of the people in town for the meeting had a fun round of friends’ poker (no betting in the state) in the hotel lobby. It was EPIC.

Thanks for the memories, Memphis!

Land of Pioneer Courage / Molecular Gastronomy

Omaha, Nebraska

Why Omaha? Because anywhere can delight your senses, my dear readers. It’s all up to you. Well, mostly.

Omaha had a lot to offer a business traveler with only a couple evenings to spare. I did my research in advance, choosing two places that would represent different slices of the dining scene (so I thought): The Grey Plume and Boiler Room.

The Grey Plume was first, and a taxi ride out of downtown in a swish new redeveloped neighborhood called Midtown Crossing.

It started with a surprise: an amuse-bouche consisting of apple-huckleberry mousse, coffee panna cotta, rye crumble, and pickled apple slice, sprinkled with coffee powder (not iocane powder, although…)
I didn’t know I’d found the seat of molecular gastronomy in Omaha! But here it was, and compliments of the chef.
It was interesting, but when I asked about the coffee powder, I learned that it was basically tapioca starch that had been infused with coffee aroma- that doesn’t seem so frou-frou, now, does it?

The next dish (this one I ordered) was duck fat fries with fried egg and aioli. Yes, loads of fat in this one, but I shared. I did!
The waitress recommended upgrading to the goose egg, but this place was already expensive enough without add-ons, so I declined the up-sell. It was deliciously salty, runny, umami and all as it was.

My ‘main’ was pork 3 ways, served with nettles: a piece of leg, slow-roasted on a puree of spaghetti squash; a piece of loin on a spaghetti squash ‘coin;’ and pork belly 2 ways: a meaty, pinkish cut, and the more traditional glazed classic pork belly, served with baby fennel.
Hot mama. I loved the slow-roasted leg and the classic fatty pork belly. I didn’t love the chewy loin or other type of pork belly.

The next night I organized an excursion to Boiler Room, located downtown near the Old Market center.

***Here’s a good tip when dining out in somewhere where you need to watch your budget but everything looks scrumptious: try two appetizers instead of an entree. This gets you more variety, hedges your bets if you end up not liking something, still fills you up, and for about the same amount of money.
Here I tried the octopus galette and the tagliatelle with goat sugo- these are things I will likely not see again, so they were calling out my name…

The goat sugo was very good, the tagliatelle vaguely disappointing (too al dente for my dente), but the octopus galette was my favorite. Basically a seafood pancake at any Korean restaurant, this was stood out because it used octopus, and marvelous flavors as accompaniments: pesto, hazelnuts, and ‘claytonia‘ (which I was informed is ‘like a lilypad’, also known as miner’s lettuce). Very tasty.

I also enjoyed the decor of the place: very 2000s-loft-converted-warehouse, but with the special touch of matching, facing staircases. The waitors were forever scampering down one and up another, their upper bodies not seen to be moving, which amused me very much for some reason. Perhaps it made me think of the octopus moving along…

  
–While in town, we also had lunch in Old Market, at a place called Twisted Fork: a bar-restaurant with its own cheeky and less pretentious fusion creations. I actually didn’t get to eat much here, but I did grab a few of their fried pickles, and they were quite good. 
I’d say it’s a tie between these and the fried pickles at Upstream around the corner. And I always appreciate clever menu phrasing, which Twisted Fork had in abundance (e.g. “Things You Don’t Rope,” including chicken and salmon dishes). God bless those cowboys with a sense of humor.
 And give thanks for that pioneer courage (a phrase from the monument above) too–
a swell place, Omaha.
Have you been to Omaha? Are you from another place with Pioneer Courage? Let us know in the comment section, so we can come visit!